Old Testament Pseudepigrapha Iiirejected Scriptures

Posted : admin On 8/23/2021
The Lexham Bible Dictionary
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This work stands among the most important publications in biblical studies over the past 25 years. Richard Bauckham, James Davila, and Alexander Panayotov’s new two-volume collection of Old Testament pseudepigrapha contains many previously unpublished and newly translated texts, complementing James Charlesworth’s Old Testament Pseudepigrapha and other earlier collections. Chapter 1 1 There was a wise man, a great artificer, and the Lord conceived love for him and received him, that he should behold the uppermost dwellings and be an eye-witness of the wise and great and inconceivable and immutable realm of God Almighty, of the very wonderful and glorious and bright and many-eyed station of the Lord’s servants, and of the inaccessible throne of the Lord, and of.

Pseudepigrapha, Old Testament
Pseudepigrapha, Old Testament A term for a modern grouping of ancient writings set in the Old Testament period but written later, mostly between 200 bc and ad 200. These works often contain pseudonymous speeches of, or are pseudonymously ascribed to, biblical and deuterocanonical figures. Many of these
The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary
Pseudepigrapha, OT
PSEUDEPIGRAPHA, OT. A modern collection of ancient writings that are essential reading for an understanding of early Judaism (ca. 250 b.c.e. to 200 c.e.) and of Christian origins. Many of these documents were compiled or composed by Jews, while others were written by Jews but eventually were expanded
The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, Revised

Old Testament Pseudepigrapha Charlesworth

Pseudepigrapha
Pseudepigraphasoo̅-də-pig̀rə-fə.
The HarperCollins Bible Dictionary (Revised and Updated)
Pseudepigrapha
Pseudepigrapha (soo´duh-pig´ruh-fuh; Gk., “falsely ascribed writings”), a collection of some sixty-five documents connected with, but not part of, the Jewish Bible (Christian ot) and written ca. 300 bce–200 ce. They are ostensibly Jewish writings, but some exist only in versions edited by later Christians,
The New Bible Dictionary, Third Edition
Pseudepigrapha
PSEUDEPIGRAPHA. The term is used to describe those Jewish writings which were excluded from the OT Canon and which find no place in the Apocrypha. For the purpose of this article the term will also exclude the sectarian documents of the Qumran library (*Dead Sea Scrolls). Unlike the Apocrypha, which
Eerdmans Dictionary of the Bible
Pseudepigrapha
PseudepigraphaLit., “falsely ascribed writings.” This anachronistic term describes a variety of ancient noncanonical Jewish documents from the Hellenistic and Roman periods (ca. 250 b.c.e.–200 c.e.). The texts are not a part of the Hebrew Bible (Protestant OT) or the OT Apocrypha (roughly equivalent
Eerdmans Bible Dictionary
Psuedepigrapha
Psuedepigrapha [sōōˊdə pĭgˊrə fə].† A general term for Jewish writings of approximately the second century B.C. through the second century A.D. not included in either the Bible, the Apocrypha, the documents found only among the Dead Sea Scrolls, the rabbinic literature, or works attributable to
Dictionary of the Later New Testament & Its Developments
Apocryphal and Pseudepigraphal Writings
Apocryphal and Pseudepigraphal WritingsThis article covers extracanonical Christian literature that is either attributed to biblical persons as authors or recounts narratives about biblical persons that parallel or supplement the biblical narratives. In most early Christian literature of this kind the
The Oxford Dictionary of the Christian Church

Old Testament Pseudepigrapha Iiirejected Scriptures Bible

Pseudepigrapha
Pseudepigrapha. Writings ascribed to some other than their real author, generally with a view to giving them an enhanced authority. The term is used esp. of the pseudonymous Jewish works, dating from the centuries immediately before and after the beginning of the Christian era, which were not included
Harper’s Bible Dictionary

Old Testament Pseudepigrapha Iiirejected Scriptures Apocrypha

Pseudepigrapha
PseudepigraphaPseudepigrapha (so̅o̅-duh-pigʹruh-fuh; Gk., ‘writings with false superscriptions’), a collection of some sixty-five documents connected with but not part of the ot and written by Jews or Christians, for the most part during the three centuries before and the two centuries after the beginning
IiirejectedPseudepigrapha
Nelson’s New Illustrated Bible Dictionary
Old Testament Pseudepigrapha Iiirejected ScripturesPseudepigrapha
PSEUDEPIGRAPHA — a collection of Jewish books containing various forms of literature, using names of famous people in Israel’s history for the titles of the books. The real authors are unknown. Such names as Ezra, Baruch, Enoch, Solomon, Moses, and Adam are used to add authority to the writing.A few
A Dictionary of Christian Biography, Literature, Sects and Doctrines, Volumes I–IV
Pseudepigrapha in the Fathers
PSEUDEPIGRAPHA IN THE FATHERS.—In the present article we give references to notices occurring in the earlier Christian writers to a variety of ancient books and shorter documents, some falsely ascribed to the personages of Scripture, others being apocryphal accounts of their life, or of some part of
  • 1 (Ethiopic Apocalypse of) Enoch (Jewish, c. 200 BCE–50 BCE) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • 2 (Slavonic Apocalypse of) Enoch (Jewish, c. 30 BCE–70 CE) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • 3 (Hebrew Apocalypse of) Enoch (Jewish, in present form from c. 108 CE-135 CE) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • Sibylline Oracles (both Jewish and Christian, c. 2nd cent. BCE–7th cent. CE) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • Treatise of Shem (c. near end of first cent. BCE) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • Apocryphon of Ezekiel (mostly lost, original form c. late 1st cent. BCE) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • Apocalypse of Zephaniah (mostly lost, original form c. late 1st cent. BCE) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • 4 Ezra (original Jewish form after 70 CE, final Christian additions later) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • Greek Apocalypse of Ezra (present form is Christian c. 9th cent. CE with both Jewish and Christian sources) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • Vision of Ezra (a Christian document dating from 4th to 7th cent. CE) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • Questions of Ezra (Christian, but date is imprecise) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • Revelation of Ezra (Christian and sometime before 9th cent. CE) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • Apocalypse of Sedrach (present form is Christian from c. 5th cent. with earlier sources) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • 2 (Syriac Apocalypse of) Baruch (Jewish, from c. 100 CE) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • 3 (Greek Apocalypse of) Baruch (Christian utilizing Jewish sources, c. 1st–2nd cent. CE) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • Apocalypse of Abraham (Jewish primarily, c. 70–150 CE) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • Apocalypse of Adam (Gnostic derived from Jewish sources from c. the 1st cent. CE) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • Apocalypse of Elijah (both Jewish and Christian, c. 150–275 CE) (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • Apocalypse of Daniel (present form c. 9th cent. CE, but contains Jewish sources from c. 4th cent. CE). (Apocalyptic and related works)

  • Testaments of the Twelve Patriarchs (current form is Christian, c. 150–200 CE, but Levi, Judah, and Naphtali are Jewish and date before 70 CE and probably 2nd–1st cent. BCE) (Testaments)

  • Testament of Job (Jewish, c. late 1st cent. BCE) (Testaments)

  • Testaments of the Three Patriarchs (Jewish Testaments of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob from c. 100 CE which are linked with the Christian Testament of Isaac and Jacob) (Testaments)

  • Testament of Moses (Jewish, from c. early 1st cent. CE) (Testaments)

  • Testament of Solomon (Jewish, current form c. 3rd cent. CE, but earliest form c. 100 CE) (Testaments)

  • Testament of Adam (Christian in current form c. late 3rd cent. CE, but used Jewish sources from c. 150–200 CE). (Testaments)

  • The Letter of Aristeas (Jewish, c. 200–150 BCE) (Expansions of Old Testament and other legends)

  • Jubilees (Jewish, c. 150–100 BCE) (Expansions of Old Testament and other legends)

  • Martyrdom and Ascension of Isaiah (has three sections, the first Jewish from c. 100 BCE, and 2nd and 3rd sections are Christian. The second from c. 2nd cent. CE, and the third— Testament of Hezekiah, c. 90–100 CE) (Expansions of Old Testament and other legends)

  • Joseph and Asenath (Jewish, c. 100 CE) (Expansions of Old Testament and other legends)

  • Life of Adam and Eve (Jewish, c. early to middle 1st cent. CE) (Expansions of Old Testament and other legends)

  • Pseudo-Philo (Jewish, c. 66–135 CE) (Expansions of Old Testament and other legends)

  • Lives of the Prophets (Jewish, c. early 1st cent. CE with later Christian additions) (Expansions of Old Testament and other legends)

  • Ladder of Jacob (earliest form is Jewish dating from late 1st cent. CE. One chapter is Christian) (Expansions of Old Testament and other legends)

  • 4 Baruch (Jewish original but edited by a Christian, c. 100–110 CE) (Expansions of Old Testament and other legends)

  • Jannes and Jambres (Christian in present form, but dependent on earlier Jewish sources from c. 1st cent. BCE) (Expansions of Old Testament and other legends)

  • History of the Rechabites (Christian in present form dating c. 6th cent. CE, but contains some Jewish sources before 100 CE) (Expansions of Old Testament and other legends)

  • Eldad and Modat (forged on basis of Numbers 11.26–29, before the 1st CE is now lost, but quoted in Shepherd of Hermas c. 140 CE) (Expansions of Old Testament and other legends)

  • History of Joseph (Jewish, but difficult to date). (Expansions of Old Testament and other legends)

  • Ahiqar (Jewish dating from late 7th or 6th cent. BCE and cited in Apocryphal Tobit) (Wisdom and philosophical literature)

  • 3 Maccabees (Jewish, c. 1st cent. BCE) (Wisdom and philosophical literature)

  • 4 Maccabees (Jewish, c. before 70 CE) (Wisdom and philosophical literature)

  • Pseudo-Phocylides (Jewish maxims attributed to 6th cent. Ionic poet, c. Ipad miniapple inc.. 50 BCE–100 CE) (Wisdom and philosophical literature)

  • The Sentences of the Syriac Menander (Jewish, c. 3rd cent. CE). (Wisdom and philosophical literature)

  • More Psalms of David (Jewish psalms from c. 3rd cent. BCE to 100 CE) (Prayers, Psalms, and Odes)

  • Prayer of Manasseh (sometimes in Apocrypha, Jewish from c. early 1st cent. CE) (Prayers, Psalms, and Odes)

  • Psalms of Solomon (Jewish, c. 50–5 BCE) (Prayers, Psalms, and Odes)

  • Hellenistic Synagogal Prayers (Jewish, c. 2nd–3rd cent. CE) (Prayers, Psalms, and Odes)

  • Prayer of Joseph (Jewish, c. 70–135) (Prayers, Psalms, and Odes)

  • Prayer of Jacob (mostly lost Jewish document from c. 4th cent. CE) (Prayers, Psalms, and Odes)

  • Odes of Solomon (Christian but influenced by Judaism and probably also Qumran, c. 100 CE) (Prayers, Psalms, and Odes)