Classroom 2

Posted : admin On 8/23/2021

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Study the instructions below for fun games that are good for classrooms, small groups, and individual students.

= A multiplication.com favorite game!

Online Games

Good for:Individuals
Duration:Varies
Difficulty:Easy
Noise level:Noisy
  • Check out our huge variety of online games, great for self-guided learning
  • We've recently introduced several multi-player games with new challenges!

Visit our Games page to get started.

Acid

Around the World

Good for:Classrooms
Duration:Long
Difficulty:Easy
Noise level:Quiet
  • Students sit in a circle, and a starting person is selected.
  • The starting person stands behind the student next to him or her.
  • The teacher holds up a flash card.
  • The student to say the answer first moves on to challenge the next student.
  • If a sitting student says the answer first, the students switch places.

This process continues until at least one student makes it completely around the circle.

Materials:
Large flash cards (PDF)

Buzz

Good for:Small groups
Duration:Flexible
Difficulty:Easy
Noise level:Quiet

This game is used to review a specific fact family and can be played in a small group or with the entire class.

  • Choose a number between 2 and 9. The first student says 1, the next student says 2, and so on.
  • Instead of saying a multiple of the selected number, the student says 'buzz.”
  • If a player forgets to say buzz or says it at the wrong time, he or she is out.
  • Continue until the group reaches the last multiple of the number times 9.
  • For example, if “2” is chosen. The first students says “1,” the next student says “buzz,” the next students says “3,” the next student says “buzz,” and so on until 18 (2 x 9) is reached.

No materials needed.

Flashcards at the Door

Good for:Classrooms
Duration:Short
Difficulty:Easy
Noise level:Noisy
  • Choose flash cards that correspond with facts the students are learning.
  • When the students line-up to enter or exit the classroom, hold up a flash card as each student passes through the door.
  • The answer to the flash card is the 'pass' into the classroom.
  • If a student misses the problem, he or she must step to the side and figure out the answer before he or she enters the classroom.

You may want to choose flash cards according to the individual student's ability. This activity may be a bit time-consuming the first couple of times you try it, but it will go faster as students memorize the facts.

Materials:
Large flash cards (PDF)

Flip Up

Good for:Pairs
Duration:Flexible
Difficulty:Easy
Noise level:Noisy

Students compete to see who can answer all of the problems correctly in the shortest amount of time.

  • Two students sit together facing each other.
  • One student holds the flash cards so the problem faces the other player.
  • The other students says the answer aloud and the student holding the card confirms the answer.
  • If the student is correct, the flash card is discarded.
  • If the student is incorrect, the card is returned to the deck.
  • The student continues until he or she has provided all of the correct answers and the students switch places.
Materials:
Large flash cards (PDF)

A timer

Multiplication Bingo

Good for:Classrooms
Duration:Varies
Difficulty:Easy
Noise level:Noisy
  • Print out the bingo card template, and make a copy for each student.
  • Each student chooses any of the 25 numbers at the bottom of the bingo card and write one in each square.
  • Remove all of the zero flash cards except one.
  • Randomly draw a flash card, and read the problem aloud.
  • Each student with the answer on their bingo card marks the square.
  • Continue until someone obtains a bingo.
Materials:
Bingo templates (PDF)
Large flash cards (PDF)

Seeing Doubles

Good for:Pairs, small groups
Duration:Flexible
Difficulty:Easy
Noise level:Noisy

Learning the multiplication facts with 2 as a factor can be fun and easy with dominoes.

  • Use domino doubles to demonstrate that multiplying by two is the same as adding doubles (e.g., 5 + 5 = 2 x 5, 6 + 6 = 2 x 6).
  • Ask your students create both addition and multiplication fact statements for the domino doubles.
Materials:
Dominoes

Slap Happy

Good for:Pairs, small groups
Duration:Flexible
Difficulty:Easy
Noise level:Noisy
  • Each player draws 7 cards. At each player's turn, the player looks for a matching problem and product.
  • If he or she a match, he or she grabs a spoon, and all of the other players attempt to grab the remaining spoons.
  • The player exposes the cards. If the player is correct, the player without a spoon writes an M (the first letter in MULTIPLY).
  • If the player is incorrect, the player writes an M. The cards are placed in a discard pile.
  • If, during a turn, the player does not have a match, he or she draws from the pile.

Each time a player spells MULTIPLY, the player is out of the game. The game continues until a single player remains.

Materials:
Spoons (one spoon less than the total number of players, for example, five spoons for six players)
Two sets of flash cards (PDF; first set with the answers and the second with the problems)
Teacher Tip: Use a Slap-o-Matic (from the HandsDown board game) instead of spoons.

Team Tag

Good for:Small groups, classrooms
Duration:Varies
Difficulty:Easy
Noise level:Noisy
  • Put two equal stacks of flash cards on a desk in the front of the room.
  • Divide the students in two groups.
  • Ask the students to form two single file lines facing the desk. The first student in each line should be about 10 feet from the desk.
  • When play starts, the first person in line races to the desk, takes the first card in his or her pile, displays the card to the team, announces the answer, places the card in a discard pile, and then races to tag the next person in line.
  • If the student does not know the answer or gives the wrong answer, he or she puts the card on the bottom of the pile and selects the next card. This student keeps selecting cards until he or she knows the answer to one or until five cards have been selected.
  • The two teams play simultaneously, and the first team to correctly answer all the multiplication facts in its pile wins.
Materials:
Two sets of flash cards (PDF)

Times Table Football

Good for:Small groups, classrooms
Duration:Varies
Difficulty:Hard
Noise level:Quiet
  • Create a field of play using the overhead projector or chalk/white board.
  • On the side of the flash card with the answer, write the results of a football play (e.g. 25 yard pass to wide out, 3 yard run by fullback, incomplete pass, lose 5 yards due to a fumble).
  • Create about 100 plays on flash cards. Most of the plays should be good results, but some plays are errors to add an element of surprise.
  • Divide your students into two teams. Each player takes a turn answering the fact.
  • If he or she answers correctly, the play on the card occurs. If a player misses a multiplication fact, the opposing team is given a chance to answer the fact correctly.
  • If the other team answers the fact correctly, the team recovers the fumble and start with a first down.
  • Start on the 20 yard line at the beginning of the game, the beginning of the second half, and after touchdowns. On the 4th down, the team may choose to try for a 1st down, punt (40 yards), or attempt a field goal (must be at least on the 40 yard line).

You can be creative with penalties (e.g., penalties can be assessed for not paying attention when it is not your turn, excessive talking, or helping someone else).

Materials:
One white board
Four sets of flash cards (PDF)

War

Classroom 2
Good for:Pairs
Duration:Varies
Difficulty:Easy
Noise level:Noisy
Classroom
  • Write on the board, Ace = 1, J = 0, Q = 11, K = 12.
  • Break the students into teams of 2, and ask the students to shuffle their cards.
  • Instruct the students to deal the cards into two piles and stack a pile facedown in front of each player.
  • Both students turn over their top cards at the same time. As quickly as possible, they multiply the 2 cards together, and shout the answer.
  • The student who says the correct answer first places the cards in his or her winning pile. If a tie occurs, students should continue to turn their cards until someone wins the pile.

When all of the original stack has been played, the players count their winnings. The player with the highest total wins.

Materials:
One deck of playing cards per each pair of students

What's Your Name, I Mean Number

Good for:Classrooms
Duration:Flexible
Difficulty:Easy
Noise level:Noisy
  • Create a name tag for each student, and write a multiplication fact (e.g. 7 x 5) on the name tag, rather than his or her name.
  • Each student wears a name tag for the day. When a student wants to speak to someone, they must call him or her by the answer to their multiplication fact. (e.g. 35).
Materials:
Nametags

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has established classifications for approximately 1,700 different generic types of devices and grouped them into 16 medical specialties referred to as panels. Each of these generic types of devices is assigned to one of three regulatory classes based on the level of control necessary to assure the safety and effectiveness of the device. The three classes and the requirements which apply to them are:

Device Class and Regulatory Controls

1. Class I General Controls

  • With Exemptions
  • Without Exemptions

2. Class II General Controls and Special Controls

  • With Exemptions
  • Without Exemptions

3. Class III General Controls and Premarket Approval

The class to which your device is assigned determines, among other things, the type of premarketing submission/application required for FDA clearance to market. If your device is classified as Class I or II, and if it is not exempt, a 510k will be required for marketing. All devices classified as exempt are subject to the limitations on exemptions. Limitations of device exemptions are covered under 21 CFR xxx.9, where xxx refers to Parts 862-892. For Class III devices, a premarket approval application (PMA) will be required unless your device is a preamendments device (on the market prior to the passage of the medical device amendments in 1976, or substantially equivalent to such a device) and PMA's have not been called for. In that case, a 510k will be the route to market.

Device classification depends on the intended use of the device and also upon indications for use. For example, a scalpel's intended use is to cut tissue. A subset of intended use arises when a more specialized indication is added in the device's labeling such as, 'for making incisions in the cornea'. Indications for use can be found in the device's labeling, but may also be conveyed orally during sale of the product. A discussion of the meaning of intended use is contained in The 510(k) Program: Evaluating Substantial Equivalence in Premarket Notification [510(k)].

In addition, classification is risk based, that is, the risk the device poses to the patient and/or the user is a major factor in the class it is assigned. Class I includes devices with the lowest risk and Class III includes those with the greatest risk.

As indicated above all classes of devices as subject to General Controls. General Controls are the baseline requirements of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic (FD&C) Act that apply to all medical devices, Class I, II, and III.

How to Determine Classification

To find the classification of your device, as well as whether any exemptions may exist, you need to find the regulation number that is the classification regulation for your device. There are two methods for accomplishing this: go directly to the classification database and search for a part of the device name, or, if you know the device panel (medical specialty) to which your device belongs, go directly to the listing for that panel and identify your device and the corresponding regulation. You may make a choice now, or continue to read the background information below. If you continue to read, you will have another chance to go to these destinations.

Classroom 2 passwords

If you already know the appropriate panel you can go directly to the CFR and find the classification for your device by reading through the list of classified devices, or if you're not sure, you can use the keyword directory in the PRODUCT CODE CLASSIFICATION DATABASE. In most cases this database will identify the classification regulation in the CFR. You can also check the classification regulations below for information on various products and how they are regulated by CDRH.

Google Classroom 2

Each classification panel in the CFR begins with a list of devices classified in that panel. Each classified device has a 7-digit number associated with it, e.g., 21 CFR 880.2920 - Clinical Mercury Thermometer. Once you find your device in the panel's beginning list, go to the section indicated: in this example, 21 CFR 880.2920 . It describes the device and says it is Class II. Similarly, in the Classification Database under 'thermometer', you'll see several entries for various types of thermometers. The three letter product code, FLK in the database for Clinical Mercury Thermometer, is also the classification number which is used on the Medical Device Listing form.

Once you have identified the correct classification regulation go to What are the Classification Panels below and click on the correct classification regulation or go to the CFR Search page. Some Class I devices are exempt from the premarket notification and/or parts of the good manufacturing practices regulations. Approximately 572 or 74% of the Class I devices are exempt from the premarket notification process. These exemptions are listed in the classification regulations of 21 CFR and also has been collected together in the Medical Device Exemptions document.

If you would like a formal device determination or classification from the FDA, consider submitting a 513(g) Request. For instructions on how to submit a 513(g) Request, refer to the guidance document “FDA and Industry Procedures for Section 513(g) Requests for Information under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act Guidance (2012).” For further information, you may view the CDRH Learn training module entitled 513(g) Requests for Information (under the section “How to Study and Market Your Device,” subsection “Classification”).

Note that there is a user fee for a 513(g) request. Per the user fees webpage, there is a reduced “Small Business” fee option for eligible businesses. You may refer to the Reduced Medical Device User Fees: Small Business Determination (SBD) Program webpage for details, including the eligibility criteria, the application process, the application guidance document, and reference to CDRH Learn educational videos.

Descriptions of Device Class

Resources For You

Classroom 2 Minute Timer For Kids

  • Presentation: How is My Medical Device Classified? (module on CDRH Learn)

Classroom 2 Game