Chapter 15: Contact And Change In Meiji Japan

Posted : admin On 8/23/2021

From Isolation to Adaptation: Japan

Chapter 15: Contact And Change In Meiji Japan

General Outcome:

15:Chapter 15: Contact And Change In Meiji Japan

How Did Japan Decide to Implement Change During the Meiji Period? Japans leaders came to a decision that to keep power they would have to change their ways of life. They changed their government, military, economy, and many other aspects of their life. How Did Modernizing the. The Imperial Diet, Japan’s first modern legislature, was established in 1890 under the 1889 Meiji Constitution, the first modern Constitution enacted in Japan. The Meiji Constitution gave the Emperor a broad range of strong powers. The Imperial Diet consisted of two houses: the House of Peers and the House of Representatives. May 13 Chapter 15 – Contact and Change in Meiji Japan May 13 Chapter 15 – Contact and Change in Meiji Japan May 27 Chapter 16 – Return to Roots June 3 Summative & Review June 10 Review June 17 Review June 26 Exam/Review Schedule. SOCIAL STUDIES 8 COURSE OUTLINE 2012-2013. The Meiji Restoration (明治維新, Meiji Ishin), referred to at the time as the Honorable Restoration (御一新, Goisshin), and also known as the Meiji Renovation, Revolution, Reform, or Renewal, was an event that restored practical imperial rule to the Empire of Japan in 1868 under Emperor Meiji.Although there were ruling Emperors before the Meiji Restoration, the events restored practical.

Through an examination of Japan, students will demonstrate an understanding and appreciation of the ways in which beliefs, values and knowledge shape worldviews and contribute to a society’s isolation or adaptation.

Values and Attitudes

Students will:

In April 1868, the new Emperor Meiji issued a 'charter oath' in which he renounced, at least officially, the restrictive measures of the past. Matthew C.Perry The commander of an American fleet, , arrived in Japan in July 1853, deliberately attempting to impress the Japanese with Western technological might.

  • appreciate the roles of time and geographic location in shaping a society’s worldview
  • appreciate how a society’s worldview can foster the choice to remain an isolated society
  • appreciate how models of governance and decision making reflect a society’s worldview
  • appreciate how a society’s worldview shapes individual citizenship and identity
Chapter 15: contact and change in meiji japan city

Knowledge and Understanding
Students will:

Analyze the effects of cultural isolation during the Edo period by exploring and reflecting upon the following questions and issues:

  • In what ways did Japan isolate itself from the rest of the world?
  • How did isolation during the Edo period lead to changes in Japan?
  • How did the changes resulting from isolation affect Japan economically, politically and socially during the Edo period?
  • How did the physical geography of Japan affect its worldview?
  • How did the shogun use the feudal system and the hierarchical social classes to maintain control of Japan?

Analyze the effects that rapid adaptation had on traditionally isolated Japan during the Meiji period by exploring and reflecting upon the following questions and issues:

  • What were the motivations for the radical changes in Japan’s model of organization during the Meiji period?
  • How did Japan adapt to changes brought on by the transition from feudal to modern models of organization?
  • How did the changes resulting from adaptation affect Japan economically, politically and socially during the Meiji period?
  • In what ways did changes resulting from isolation in the Edo period compare to changes resulting from adaptation in the Meiji period?
  • What challenges emerged for the Japanese in maintaining traditional cultural aspects of their society while undergoing rapid change?

Textbook

Presentations/Notes:Elm327 instructions.

Chapter 15: Contact And Change In Meiji Japan City

  • Japan Under the Shogun Presentation
  • Meiji Japan – Contact and Change

Classwork:

Assignments:

Japan

Video’s and Video Questions:

Study Guides:

Chapter 15: Contact And Change In Meiji Japan Language

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