22irregular Verbssindarin Lessons

Posted : admin On 8/22/2021

What are past tense irregular verbs?

  1. 22 Irregular Verbs Sindarin Lessons For Beginners
  2. Irregular Verbs List
  3. Irregular Verbs Worksheet
  4. 22 Irregular Verbs Sindarin Lessons Pdf
  5. 22 Irregular Verbs Sindarin Lessons Examples

Past tense verbs come in two forms, regular and irregular. Regular past tense verbs are easy to form – you add “ed” to the end of the verb (e.g. I play guitar –> I played guitar). Irregular verbs however, are not formed so simply and have no consistent form. Therefore, their past tense forms have to be learned.

Here are some common irregular verbs with their past tense forms:

wake up –> woke up
eat –> ate
drink –> drank
go –> went
sing –> sang
swim –> swam
have –> had
come –> came
ride –> rode
do –> did
put –> put
sleep –> slept
give –> gave
write –> wrote
read –> read
run –> ran

The verb “to be” is a very important verb in the English language. It is used in many situations. The verb “to be” is irregular. It doesn’t have the same form or follow the same grammar rules as regular verbs. Verb worksheets for grade 1 students. These worksheets introduce verbs as action words. Identifying and using verbs is emphasized, and the past, present & future tenses are considered. Part of a collection of free grammar worksheets from K5 Learning; no registration required.

Notes:

In this lesson students will practice using the past simple tense with some common irregular verbs.
IMPORTANT: This lesson should be taught after the past regular verbs lesson.

Lesson Procedure:

Warm Up and Maintenance:

See our 'Warm Up & Wrap Up' page.

New Learning and Practice:
Beginners

1. Review past tense regular verbs – 'Spin the Bottle' game
Your students will have covered some regular verbs using the past tense form in a previous lesson. Let’s begin this lesson with a review of these by playing a fun game of 'Spin the Bottle'.

Have everyone sit in a circle. The teacher starts by spinning a plastic bottle in the middle of the circle. Whoever the bottle points at when it stops spinning is shown one the regular verbs flashcards (from the previous lesson) - make sure no one else sees the flashcard. That student must then say 'Yesterday I …' and act out the verb on the card. Everyone has to guess what he/she is doing and shout out the correct verb in the past tense (E.g. 'jumped in puddles'). Play until you have practiced all of the verbs on the cards.

2. Review the structure 'Yesterday, I verb+ed'
On the board, draw a vertical line down the middle, dividing the board into two equal halves. Stick the regular verb flashcards from the spin the bottle game onto the left-half of the board. Tell your students you are going to ask each person 'What did you do yesterday?' and they have to give an answer using one of the verb flashcards on the board using 'Yesterday, I …' and their answer must be true. Go around the class and get everyone to give you an answer. Also, ask at least one extra question to each student (e.g. 'What did you watch on TV?').

3. Teach vocab for irregular verbs in the present and past tense form
Before class, print the following flashcards: wake up, eat, drink, go to school, sing, swim, star jump (we’ll use this for 'have fun'), go home (use for 'come back home'), ride a bike, do homework, put on, sleep. Divide the class up into groups of 3 or 4 and divide the flashcards between the groups.

Lessons

Next, on the right-side of the board draw 12 circles. Students will be sticking the flashcards inside the circles, so make them just big enough to fit the cards inside. Under each circle write verbs as follows:

  • wake up – woke up
  • eat my breakfast – ate my breakfast
  • drink my milk – drank my milk
  • go to school – went to school
  • sing a song – sang a song
  • swim in the pool – swam in the pool
  • have fun – had fun
  • come back home – came back home
  • ride my bike – rode my bike
  • do my homework – did my homework
  • put on my pajamas – put on my pajamas
  • sleep all night – slept all night

Invite a student up with one of their flashcards and ask him/her to place it into the correct circle on the board – their team-mates can help. A lot of the vocabulary will have been studied in previous lessons so your students should be able to get the correct answer for most of the circles – if not, you can help by saying 'no, try again' until the student has stuck the card into the correct circle. Keep going until all of the flashcards have been stuck on the board in the circles.

Next, chorus each verb three times (e.g. Teacher: 'wake up, woke up', Students 'wake up, woke up' … 2 more times). Don’t worry at this stage if your students don’t understand why there are two versions of each verb – we’ll come to that next.

Finally, write the word 'Yesterday' at the top of the board and draw a red circle around it (or a different color to the color of the word) and chorus 'Yesterday'. Point at the first flashcard and say 'Yesterday, I wake up. Is that ok? Wake up?”. Try and get someone to say the correct form 'Woke up'. Circle the word 'woke' in red (to signify this is the correct form of the verb to use with the word 'Yesterday'). Now go through all of the remaining verbs asking your students which is the correct form and circling the past tense version in red.

4. Pair practice: saying past tense irregular verbs
In pairs, students are going to say the infinitive and past tense of the verbs together – once with both students looking at the board and the second time with one student looking away from the board (being tested).

First round: Put students in pairs. Start by modeling the activity with another student and both sit looking at the board. Teacher starts by saying the infinitive form of a verb and his/her partner has to say the past form with the phrase 'Yesterday, I …', for example:

Teacher: drink my milk.
Student: Yesterday, I drank my milk.
Teacher: ride my bike.
Student: Yesterday, I rode my bike.

Once everyone understands what to do, have the pairs go through all of the verbs, changing roles after all the verbs have been practiced so both get the chance to say the past forms.

List

Second round: Keep everyone in the same pairs, however one student must sit with their back to the board. Students do the same thing but the student with his/her back to the board must try and remember the correct past tense form – their partners can help if they get stuck. Again, change roles. Once finished, get everyone to find a new partner and try again, one with their back to the board.

Irregular verbs exercises

5. Play 'Past Tense Charades' in small groups
Start by modeling: look at the flashcards on the board (including the regular verbs on the left-side) and do an action or gesture. Elicit what you are doing using the structure 'Yesterday, I …' (e.g.'Yesterday, I kicked a ball', 'Yesterday, I slept all night').

Then put everyone in small groups of 3 or 4. One person in each group starts by acting out a verb and the other members have to shout out the correct answer using the structure 'Yesterday, I …'. The first person in the group to say the correct answer can do the next action. Continue until each group has completed actions for all of the verbs.

6. Play 'What did you do yesterday? Line Up'
Divide the class into two groups and have each group form a line, so that both teams are lined up facing each other. To begin, each team is going to race to pass a balloon up and down the line with the winning team the first to get the balloon passed back to the first student. Give a balloon (or rolled up paper ball) to the first member of each team. Say, 'Ready, steady, go!'. Each team races to pass the balloon, hand-to-hand, up and down the line.


Next, give everyone a verb flashcard (use all the irregular verbs first). Explain that each time you pass the balloon you have to ask 'What did you do yesterday?' and when you receive the balloon you have to say 'I (ate my breakfast)' depending on the flashcard you have been given. Both teams race, passing the balloon and saying the structures. You can play other rounds with different rules, such as:

  • teams must pass the balloon without using their hands (e.g. under chins, between knees, etc.)
  • teams can only tap the balloons – they can't hold them in any way
  • teams have to kick or head the balloons but not hold

7. Sing 'What did you do Yesterday?'
The first time you play the song, put up the What did you do Yesterday? song poster on the board. Quickly elicit the vocab. Play the song and sing along doing the gestures, as described below in Gestures and activities for 'What did you do Yesterday?'. Play 2 or 3 times.

Lyrics for 'What did you do Yesterday?'

Chorus:
What did you do?
What did you do yesterday?

Verse 1:
I woke up (woke, woke, woke)
I ate my breakfast (ate, ate, ate)
I drank my milk (drank, drank, drank)
And then I went to school.

Chorus:
What did you do?
What did you do yesterday?

Verse 2:
I sang a song (sang, sang, sang)
I swam in the pool (swam, swam, swam)
I had lots of fun (had, had, had)
And then I came back home.

Chorus:
What did you do?
What did you do yesterday?

Verse 3:
I rode my bike (rode, rode, rode)
I did my homework (did, did, did)
I put on my pajamas (put, put, put)
And then I slept all night.

(download MP3 here)

Gestures and activities for 'What did you do Yesterday?'

The gestures are simple and fun to do, matching the verbs in the song.

22 Irregular Verbs Sindarin Lessons For Beginners

Chorus:

  • hands together, rocking your arms back and forth in time with the music

Verses:

  • I woke up: stretch and yawn
  • I ate my breakfast: pretend to eat cereal with a spoon
  • I drank my milk: pretend to drink
  • And then I went to school: walking on the spot and waving goodbye
  • I sang a song: arms outstretched in a singing position
  • I swam in the pool: pretend to swim
  • I had lots of fun: wave your hands in the air while smiling
  • And then I came back home: knocking on an imaginary door
  • I rode my bike: do a cycling motion
  • I did my homework: pretend to write
  • I put on my pajamas: pretend to put on a pajamas top and button it up
  • And then I slept all night: do a sleeping gesture

We also have a video that you can stream in class to sing along with (Internet connection required):

8. Do the 'What did you do yesterday?' worksheet
Give out the worksheets and have everyone draw and write about what they did yesterday – make sure everyone understands that these are their true answers. Circulate as everyone is working away, and ask lots of questions (e.g. What’s this?, What did you do yesterday? Did you ride your bike?, etc.).

When everyone has finished, go around the class asking everybody to tell you some things they did yesterday.

9. Play 'Blindfold Guess'
This is a really fun game to conclude the lesson – you will need a blindfold. Get everyone to form a large circle and give everyone a verb flashcard (tell everyone to keep their flashcard secret and not to show anyone).

Next, invite one person to volunteer to be blindfolded. Once the blindfold is on, spin him/her around in the middle of the circle and then tell him/her to go forward and ask the person they first bump into 'What did you do yesterday?'. That person needs to answer the question, based on his/her flashcard. However, s/he can speak in a funny voice to avoid being identified. Then the blindfolded person must guess who it is. Play so that everyone has a turn to be blindfolded.

Wrap Up:

1. Assign Homework: 'Past Irregular Verbs' worksheet.
2. Wrap up the lesson with some ideas from our 'Warm Up & Wrap Up' page.

What are past simple regular verbs?

Lessons

Past simple tense verbs come in two forms: regular and irregular, and are used to talk about completed actions in the past. Regular simple past tense verbs are easy to form – you add “ed” to the end of the verb (e.g. I play guitar –> I played guitar).

The past tense simple for regular verbs often has a time reference:

  • Yesterday, I played with my friends.
  • She watched TV this morning.
  • Last Saturday they walked in the park.
  • We watched TV last night.

The simple past tense with regular verbs is formed as follows:

  • Positive: I jumped in puddles (subject + verb+ed)
  • Negative: He didn'tplay a game (subject + did + not + infinitve verb)
  • Wh question: What did you do yesterday? (Wh question + did + subject + infintive verb)
  • Yes/No question: Did he dance with you? (Did + subject + infinitive verb)
Notes:

In this lesson students will practice using the past simple tense with some common regular verbs.

Lesson Procedure:

Warm Up and Maintenance:

See our 'Warm Up & Wrap Up' page.

New Learning and Practice:

1. Teach 'today', 'yesterday' and 'tomorrow'
The lesson is based around what your students did yesterday so we will begin with three important time words.

Take a calendar and sit down with your students looking at it … it won't be long before everyone takes an interest in what you are doing. If you have already taught days of the week and months, point to different days and months and ask what they are. You can also ask students to show you on the calendar when their birthdays are, Christmas and other holidays.

Next, point at today's date on the calendar and ask, 'What day is this?'. As well as the actual day (e.g. Wednesday) teach 'today'. Then point to the days before and after today's date and teach 'yesterday' and 'tomorrow'.

2. Play 'Days Rope Jump'
You'll need a length of rope, long enough to lay along the length of your classroom. Lay the rope on the floor and stand facing the rope, so it is horizontal to you. Get all the students to stand on the rope, facing you.

Now demonstrate: jump one step back and shout 'yesterday'. Jump one step forward onto the rope and shout 'today'. Then jump one step forward, in front of the rope and shout 'tomorrow'. Then get everyone jumping, backwards and forwards as everybody shouts together 'yesterday – today – tomorrow – today – yesterday – today – tomorrow – today – etc.'. Keep going, getting faster and faster until it gets too quick to keep up.

Next, you are going to do the same thing, but the teacher is going to say the days randomly. Step class videos. Everyone has to listen carefully and jump into the correct position according to the day the teacher shouts:

  • yesterday = behind the rope
  • today = on the rope
  • tomorrow = in front of the rope

As you do this, try and trick people by saying the same day twice and go at different speeds. As students make mistakes they have to sit out of the game until there is only one left, who is the winner. It’s a really fun game and you can play this a few times.

3. Teach vocab for verbs and the regular past tense form
Get everyone to sit down. On the board write 'Yesterday, I …'. Look like you are thinking and say to yourself 'Hmm. What did I do yesterday?'. Then draw a few things which you (may or may not) did yesterday, e.g. watched TV, kicked a ball, played a video game, etc. Make sure they are regular verb activities and try and use some from the song. As you are drawing the pictures get students to shout out what they think each one is and write the simple tense form under each picture (watch TV).

When you have 3 or 4 pictures on the board take a different colored marker pen/chalk. Underline 'Yesterday' and write 'ed' onto the end of the verbs (e.g. Yesterday, I watched TV). Then chorus each of the sentences (e.g. 'Yesterday, I watched TV').

4. Practice saying past tense regular verbs
Before class, print off as many flashcards as you can for regular verbs. Make sure you include the flashcards for the verbs in the song.

Spread the flashcards out, face up, on the floor or a table and get everyone to gather round. Start off by saying, 'Yesterday, I …' and select a flashcard and stick it to the board. Then get each student to pick a flashcard of something they did yesterday and also stick to the board – if you have a small class, get students to choose more cards – try and aim for about 10-15 cards and make sure the cards for the song vocab have been selected.

Your board should now be full of flashcards. Your students will probably know some of the verbs from previous lessons and other words they can now learn. Start by touching one card and elicit or teach the verb with the 'ed' ending and write the word under the card. Chorus the word 3 times and then move onto the next card. Go through all the cards, at a brisk pace so no one gets bored.

Next, give out the 'What did you do yesterday? Survey' worksheet. On each line, get everyone to copy 12 verbs in the past form from the board (e.g. 'painted a picture', 'watched TV'). This sheet will be used in the next stage of the lesson.

Finally, with all of the cards and words on the board, point at a card randomly and get everyone to shout out the word. Go quickly through all of the words. Then, have everyone close their eyes. Remove a card and erase the word. Then shout 'Open your eyes!' and ask the first student who puts their hand up to say what the missing verb is. If correct, that student can come up to the board and remove the next card (while everyone else closes their eyes), say 'Open your eyes!' and select the first student who puts their hand up. Continue until all of the cards have been removed from the board.

5. Do the 'What did you do yesterday? Survey' worksheet
Everyone will have filled in the verbs column of their worksheet from the previous activity. Get everyone to stand up and mingle around the classroom so they can fill in their survey. Be sure to model first so that everyone is clear of what to do. The conversations should be as follows:

Student A: Ana, what did you do yesterday?
Student B: Yesterday, I watched TV, played a game, kicked a ball, etc.
(Student A circles the corresponding cells in the survey worksheet).

When everyone has completed their surveys, pool the answers to find out which of yesterday’s activities were the most common.

6. Sing 'Yesterday was a Great Day!'
The first time you play the song, put up the Yesterday was a Great Day! song poster on the board. Quickly elicit the vocab. Play the song and sing along doing the gestures, as described below in 'Gestures and activities for 'Yesterday was a Great Day!'. Play 2 or 3 times.

Lyrics for 'Yesterday was a Great Day!'

Chorus:
Yesterday, yesterday, yesterday
It was a fantastic day!
Yesterday, yesterday
It was a great day!

Verse 1:
I played with my friends (played!)
I painted a picture (painted!)
I walked in the park (walked!)
I watched TV (watched!).
Yesterday, it was a great day!

Chorus:
Yesterday, yesterday, yesterday
It was a fantastic day!
Yesterday, yesterday
It was a great day!

Verse 2:
I jumped in puddles (jumped!)
I played a game (played!)
I kicked a ball (kicked!)
I danced and danced (danced!)
Yesterday, it was a great day!

(download MP3 here)

Gestures and activities for 'Yesterday was a Great Day!'

The gestures are simple and fun to do, matching the verbs in the song.

Chorus:

  • 'Yesterday, yesterday, yesterday': stand with feet together and raise your hands up into the air (up and down) on each 'Yesterday' (so to form a 'Y' shape for 'Yesterday'
  • 'It was a fantastic/great day!': put your hands over your heart

Verse:

  • I played with my friends: put your arms around your closest partners
  • I painted a picture: pretend to paint a picture
  • I walked in the park: walk on the spot
  • I watched TV: fold arms and pretend to watch TV
  • I jumped in puddles: jump
  • I played a game: pretend to hold and play with a GameBoy (pressing buttons)
  • I kicked a ball: pretend to kick a ball
  • I danced and danced: dance!

We also have a video that you can stream in class to sing along with (Internet connection required):

7. Read classroom reader 'Silly Willy's Great Day'
This reader follows on perfectly from the song and helps to reinforce the new vocab with a fun story. Before class, download and print off the reader 'Silly Willy's Great Day'. As you go through each page, point to the different things Silly Willy did yesterday and elicit the past tense verbs, as well as eliciting what is strange about each activity he does, for example:

Teacher: (reading from page 2) 'What did you do, Silly Willy?' Look at the picture. What did Silly Willy do yesterday?
Students: He watched T.V.!
Teacher: Yes, that's right. (reading) .. 'Well, first of all, I watched T.V.'. Good! But what is strange about this? (teacher making confused expression while pointing at the picture)
Students: He watched T.V. upside down!
Teacher: Oh yes! Silly, Silly Willy! (Turning to page 2) .. Oh, look! What else did Silly Willy do yesterday?
Students: He painted a picture!
Teacher: Yes, he did! But look, what happened?
Students: He painted the picture on his walls!
Teacher: Yes, silly, Silly Willy! Look, he even painted over his cat!
etc.

Continue through the story, eliciting the key vocab. Get the students really involved in the story by asking lots of questions (e.g. about the colors and objects on each page).

Irregular Verbs List

After reading the story, give out a reader worksheet to each student and read through the story one more time (without stopping for questions, etc.) so students can put the pictures in the order of the story and write the missing verbs. Then go through the answers as a class.

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Alternatively, watch our video version of the reader (Internet connection required):

Irregular Verbs Worksheet

8. Play 'Past Tense Slap'
This is a very simple activity to conclude the lesson. Put your students into teams. Hold up a verb flashcard everyone have to slap the table if they know the verb. The student who slaps the table first to give his/her answer with the correct 'ed' ending wins a point for their team.

22 Irregular Verbs Sindarin Lessons Pdf

Wrap Up:

22 Irregular Verbs Sindarin Lessons Examples

1. Assign Homework: 'Past Regular Verbs' worksheet.
2. Wrap up the lesson with some ideas from our 'Warm Up & Wrap Up' page.